History of Silver

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Silver: Silver is a chemical element. The chemical symbol for silver is Ag. Silver’s Atomic number is 47. Silver is an element known to people from ancient times. Silver is more used than gold. In ancient times the gold price was less than Silver. But now the gold price is more than Silver. Silver has had an enduring role in most human cultures. Silver dissolves dissolved in water produces colder solutions that destroy harmful germs. Silver solubility is very low in the water, but it is sufficient as a bactericidal.

Silver Discovery: People have been mining silver since at least 3,000 BC in Turkey and Greece. Besides India, China, and Japan is the source of Silver production.

Silver Naming: Silver name comes from the Anglo-Saxon word “Seolfor” for the element. The symbol Ag comes from the Latin word “Argentina”. Argentina also gets is the name from Silver.

Silver Coinage: In the 6th century BCE, the first coins were minted in Lydia. 600 BCE, the Greek first appeared coins at Aegina. 510 BCE Danius I introduced coinage in Persia. 470 BCE Byblos introduced coins. Silver coins were of relatively high value.

Uses of Silver: Silver used for Jewelry, Silverware, Medals, electrical contacts, batteries, solder, and others. Used in different sectors with silver.

Electrical and Electronics: Silver holds excellent electrical conductivity. Silver is used on many types of electrical equipment. For example, printed circuit boards, Tv screens, Switches, telephones, computer keyboards, microwaves, and ovens. This metal is highly reliable and durable for many cycles.

Chemical Equipment: Silver is useful in the manufacture of chemical equipment on account of its low chemical reactivity, high thermal conductivity, and is easily workable. Alloyed with 0.15% nickel to avoid recrystallization of the metal at red heat. Copper and silver are also used when doing chemistry with fluorine.

See More: 

History of Gold.

History of Diamonds.


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *